Hiking Pants for Backpacking?

QUESTION:

I noticed that the only reviews you have on pants are not recommended for backpacking. Because they are low rise. It seems like my pack belt pushes my lower rise pants down. which stinks. I noticed that some of the better men’s pants have a soft lining around the waist to cushion the belt on the pack and prevent it from creasing your skin. Is it better for the pants to be fully under the belt or partially under or totally under the belt completely. I want to hike with about a 25 lb pack and would like to know what you think might be the best choice.

-Haley

ANSWER:

Paramount Peak Convertible Pants
Paramount Peak Convertible Pants

Great question, Haley! You are correct – I don’t like the North Face Horizon Utility Pants (or the new version called the Horizon Tempest pants) for hiking with any backpack over about 10 pounds. Because they are low rise, the backpack’s hip belt tends to push the pants down even lower, which can lead to chafing.

What I recommend for backpacking or day hikes with a full pack are the North Face Women’s Paramount Peak pants. The are slightly higher rise than others on the market, and have a drawstring inside to help secure the pants at your waist. These are the newer version of my favorite North Face Paramount Porter pants (see Hiking Lady review of the Paramount Porter pants.)

The best way to prevent chafing is to have slightly higher rise pants, and have the hip belt fit over the pants.

Happy trails!
Hiking Lady

Do you have a question for the Hiking Lady?

3 comments

  1. Hiking Lady says:

    Hi Garrett,
    Great question. Hydration bladders, including the Camelbak antidote (see my review of the Camelbak Antidote here) can be put in your backpack, with the tube sticking out so that you can drink water and hike at the same time. Many backpacks have a small pouch in the main compartment to help keep the hydration bladder in place…otherwise it will flop around in your backpack. Additionally, many backpacks have a small slot that enables you to have the tube of the bladder accessible. If your backpack doesn’t have a pouch to help secure the bladder in place, I’m sure you could remedy it by strategically placing your gear inside. A well placed jacket or fleece will help keep it from flopping around as you hike. Hope that helps!

  2. Garrett says:

    I have a kelty pack, just big enough for a couple days hiking. I have always used an empty 2 liter soda bottle for water. I am looking at getting a camelback antidote. Can I just put it in the top of my pack, or does it have to go inside something first?
    thanks for your time!

  3. Trail Walker says:

    Thanks for the good respomse to the question re/ having the correct pants for the particular backpack/hike.
    I then went to your review of the Paramount Porter pants that was also helpful; good question and good answer and review.

    Happy Trails to you!

Comment or Question:

Your email address will not be published.